Thursday, July 7, 2016

Seeking BATTI Supervisors

BATTI (Bay Area Teacher Training Institute) is seeking additional supervisors for their San Francisco cohort.  Supervisors work with first year BATTI intern teachers by providing feedback and support. Each supervisor works with 2-3 intern teachers and will visit the teacher at his/her school placement eight times during the school year. Guidelines are listed below.  If interested, please contact Raleigh Zwerin (raleigh@ba-tti.org) or Bob Houghteling (bob@ba-tti.org). Additional contact information: 6134 Harwood Ave • Oakland, CA 94618 • (510) 655-2944 


BATTI SUPERVISOR GUIDELINES: for supervisors of first-year candidates 2016-2017


1.   Please coordinate with your intern and her lead teacher/mentor ahead of time to schedule observations. Be kind but also firm in insisting that your intern be professional by returning your emails on time, avoiding scheduling conflicts and remembering appointments.

2.   You are observing eight times this year: four visits in the fall and four in the spring. Your visit in each class should be from 30 to 45 minutes.

3.   The very first observation is often informal and does not require the intern to submit a lesson plan. During this first visit you are getting to know the intern, mentor, classroom, and school. At your first observation interns may read a story, lead a morning meeting, or work with individual children.

4.   On succeeding visits interns should send you a lesson plan prior to each visit. As the year progresses interns will take on more responsibility in the classroom in a variety of subject areas.

5.   Leave at least 10-15 minutes after the observation for a de-briefing.  Interns need reassurance that they are on the right track. You may want to leave a note if you are unable to speak with an intern, giving some kudos and some things to think about. Call your intern at a later time that day or evening if you aren’t able to meet in person.

6.   Within 48 hours of your visit, you should email your observation report to the intern, with a copy to Bob for the file, and a copy to the mentor. Reports should take approximately a half hour to complete.

·    Your first report may be informal and include a few paragraphs of introduction, a summary, and first observations- not necessarily following the template you will rely on later.
·    Your reports should be upbeat.
·    You should be honest and point out your areas of concern, and the important suggestions you have for growth. Use the positive, negative, positive sandwich. Students want constructive feedback, showing them areas where they can consider another way of doing something. “Great work” alone is encouraging, but not as helpful as specific comments and suggestions that comprise a more complete report.
·    OPTIONAL- after the first visit you may ask interns to write a brief self-reflection describing strong and weak aspects of the lesson.
·    Don’t let yourself get behind on sending these observations. The students really benefit from them, and they lose their effectiveness after their short shelf life.

7.   Email mentors prior to your first visit to introduce yourself and briefly describe your role. Take time to introduce yourself in person during your first visit. The mentor will attend a workshop in early October, which describes their role in detail.

8.   Try to maintain a relationship throughout the year (time permitting) with the lead teacher/mentor. You may listen to mentor’s comments on the intern’s progress, and you may even hear some gripes or criticisms about the intern. Please remember you are the intern’s advocate.

9.   Email Bob once a semester to give a quick summary of how each intern is doing. “Meg is great” almost does the job, but more detail is appreciated. Alert Bob of any trouble brewing in the intern/mentor relationship, or if you feel an intern is stalled in her growth. Let’s try to intervene early if we see problems, rather than catching them in April.


 

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